Public Policy

We connect Philanthropy New York members to policymakers and act as a voice on local, state and federal public policy issues that promote effective philanthropy and build stronger communities.

We monitor and address legislation and regulations that directly affect our sector.

We engage our member foundations in public policy that directly affects the issue areas they fund, such as education, health, social justice and the arts.

We see policy work as a way to achieve our mission of promoting — and protecting — philanthropy and a strong nonprofit sector in the region. We are strengthening the voice of our foundation community to create greater giving impact. more >>

How We Engage in Public Policy

Weighing in on policies directly affecting the sector: We monitor and address legislation and regulations that directly affect foundations and the larger nonprofit sector. We will only take a position on a proposed bill or rule if it is clear that the majority of our members agree and we have engaged in a substantial process of engaging them. Our board developed that process to determine when — if at all — Philanthropy New York should take a position on sector-related matters.

Promoting solutions in issue areas: We engage our members in public policy that directly affects the issue areas they fund, such as education, health, social justice and the arts. Although we don't anticipate Philanthropy New York will take positions on proposed bills or rules in those areas, we work to ensure our members have the policy data, skills and connections they need to achieve their missions and help their grantees.

 

PNY's 2018 Public Policy Slate

Philanthropy New York's Public Policy Slate elaborates why we engage in policy work, our organization's core principles for our policy work and our advocacy agenda for the year. 

Read PNY's full 2018 Public Policy Slate here or the printable version here.

 

 

New Views on Policy

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Loni M. Bordoloi Pazich, Ph.D., Program Director, The Teagle Foundation and Tony Banout, Ph.D., Vice President of Institutional Advancement, Interfaith Youth Corps write "Philanthropy works best when it advances solutions to that which seems unsolvable, such as the dominant notion that religious groups have always, and will always, be locked in violent conflict. The stickiness of this idea in news journalism and the popular imagination all too easily becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, quickly leading to resignation."

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Maya Winkelstein, Executive Director, Open Road Alliance writes "When is an organization no longer a ‘start-up’? Is it age, size, or some other acquired wisdom that moves it out of the ‘test and experiment’ stage into the ‘institutional’ one? When is it time for an organization to change or adapt?"

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Ana Oliveira, President & CEO, The New York Women’s Foundation writes about the importance of participatory grantmaking.

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Michael Bzdak Executive Director, Global Community Impact, Johnson & Johnson reflects on the turning point of Larry Fink’s ‘BlackRock Letter’ to business leaders and the urgent need to embrace large-scale collaboration to meet each of the 17 SDGs.