Food for Thought: A Conversation Series


Food for Thought is a series of conversations hosted by the Committee for Equitable and Inclusive Philanthropy for PNY members to discuss “equity” as a tool to buttress their philanthropic practice and as a lens through which to understand current events. Rather than follow a set agenda, the conversations provide a forum for members to engage in informal, interactive discussions exploring issues of equity and inclusion by analyzing and discussing recent articles, research, editorials, and other media.

Register today:

 

Past Sessions

Bring your lunch and join your peers at these lively conversations.  Beverages and treats will be provided.

To learn more about Food for Thought, contact Kimberly Roberts at kroberts@philanthropynewyork.org.

Walking the Walk: Operationalizing Lessons from Decolonizing Wealth and Winners Take All

Racial and economic inequality are codified within philanthropy's institutional structure and often perpetuate the very inequities philanthropy tries to eradicate. Edgar Villanueva, Anand Giridharadas and others have taken aim at the philanthropic sector for not doing more to dismantle these disparities and question why, despite the sector's best efforts to address these issues, the problem persists. As philanthropy professionals, what can we do to promote a more diverse, equitable and inclusive sector? How can we start, build and lead efforts that result in real change?

Resources

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Resources

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Beyond Bail: Justice Reform 2.0

After decades of advocacy work, criminal justice reformers have seen their efforts materialize into concrete legislative reforms. Most recently, New York, New Jersey, Washington DC and California have enacted reforms that address several issues including cash bail and pre-trial release. At the federal level, Congress passed The First Step Act that aims to help the formerly incarcerated transition back into everyday life. However, advocates are concerned that poor implementation may undermine their efforts and create unforseen barriers to meaningful reform. How can the philanthropic sector ensure hard won gains are not lost as reforms are implemented? What are the potential pitfalls of what funders need to be aware of? How can we lead the next level of reforms?

Resources

Stay tuned - more to follow.